Clicky

Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Shane

Gatineau Park - Carbide Willson Ruins

Recommended Posts

IMG_4106.thumb.jpg.8dd8092e95b16e80815ffb5e321acef5.jpgA beautiful clear Saturday afternoon called for a visit to Gatineau Park to do some hiking. The park is famous for its endless trails and the multitude of choices of where to go and how to get there. This trip was to visit the Carbide Willson Ruins. Located to the North of Meech lake, the ruins can be found after the 3km hike. The trail is not very challenging to get to the ruins, however, there is a long hill halfway there.

Surprisingly, the trail is quite popular and well traveled. Definitely, one of the more popular locations to visit.

Starting from the P11 parking lot by Meech lake, the trail heads up the hill to the North. The forest canopy providing plenty of cover and shade as you make the trip.

IMG_4093.thumb.jpg.4a45451ec8b0d4963d17ab96665de3f3.jpg

IMG_4104.thumb.jpg.280e955944fb99697e754bed6bab531b.jpg

Eventually, you reach a long downhill section, which culminates with a bridge over the lake. Looking South from here you can see Meech lake and the cottages that flank the shoreline. 

IMG_4097.thumb.jpg.9a58d07082f30f8788ddb200bc654e50.jpg

IMG_4098.thumb.jpg.51a4454aa12c87154700b37a4348634a.jpg

IMG_4103.thumb.jpg.56ff93a8092cf41f359d106e2d750386.jpg

IMG_4101.thumb.jpg.79fbfdc12e3b1fb833a78fe347bd2030.jpg

Continuing along the path, you will eventually reach a directional sign post. Oddly enough, to get to the Ruins, you need to head in the Un-Marked direction (in other words, to the Right). 

IMG_4106.thumb.jpg.8dd8092e95b16e80815ffb5e321acef5.jpg

IMG_4111.thumb.jpg.58e1ff625ff56fcad11b2a38e3d684f0.jpg

IMG_4112.thumb.jpg.513af54f9d9356e0ae91563fce8ab3fb.jpg

Very shortly after, you will arrive at the Ruins. With waterfalls and cascading streams, the building is something out of a movie. Tall and imposing over its domain, it is slowly being taken back by nature. Trees, vines and leaves shoot up from the inside of the building, which no longer has any windows, doors, floors or roof.

IMG_4105.thumb.jpg.5051916c3b51ebe875cfabf1172e4eaa.jpg

The site is spectacular. A small bridge crosses over the water to the other side.

IMG_4108.thumb.jpg.0cb7475c94e2eaff8a2a954f26a82230.jpg

IMG_4114.thumb.jpg.54b420d6efd62bc65dfd485fc84475cc.jpg

A curious round building.

The Carbine Willson Ruins were originally constructed as a factory to produce Calcium Carbide fertilizer. The structures took approximately 1000 bags of cement and were built in the early 1910s.

No matter how you look at it, the site is immensely impressive.

IMG_4115.thumb.jpg.5679a04433db3637b1feee1f1436b56a.jpg

Beyond the ruins, the trail continues North and eventually hits more junctions, heading off in all directions of Gatineau Park.

Definitely something unique and different to experience, the Carbide Willson Ruins are another treasure of Gatineau Park, waiting for you to discover. No doubt, the Ruins will be even more spectacular when surrounded by the coming fall colours.

Happy hiking!

IMG_4113.jpg

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Latest Experiences

  • Similar Content

    • By Shane
      It had been 3 years since we last explored these trails. With another hot and summery day upon us, it was time to stay cool by hitting the trails during the heat wave. It's truly amazing how nature and the trees can help regulate the heat. You really do not feel as hot when under the tree canopy.
      Arriving shortly after 11am (as the Gatineau Parkway roads are closed till 11 for the Sunday Bikedays), we parked at the lot by the Waterfall Trail. A short little slope down and to the left we find the tunnel, which passes under the parkway. After emerging on the other side, a fairly short hike brings us right to the Bridal Veil Falls. Heading back up and now to to the Lauriault Trail, the long trek begins. The terrain is relatively easy to cross, although there are some mild to hills along the way to go up and over.


      Eventually you arrive at a clearing and lookout point, perfect to see the surrounding region from up above.


      Heading back into the forest, the path takes us up one more hill and then back down some stairs into the Lauriault Parking lot. Here the trail gets a bit tricky if you aren't familiar with it (as it isn't marked where to go next). In actuality, you need to immediately cross the parkway road to the other side and the path resumes there. If you do not cross, you will find other paths that arrive at a small lake and picnic areas, very pretty, but with no real exit as they just loop back into the parking.


      After crossing the road, the trail continues, following the direction of the signpost towards the Waterfall Trail and Parking.
      This final stretch of the trail is relatively easy, with just a few hills, and before you know it (well it was longer than that), you arrive near the tunnel and the parking once again.
      A great trail to discover with a few sights to see along the way.
      Happy hiking!
      Here are some more photos from this hike.





    • By Shane
      It was a beautiful Sunday morning. Wanting to change things up a bit from our usual weekend routine of kayaking or hiking, we decided to go cycling. As we live in the Plateau sector of Gatineau, it is unbelievably easy to bike in minutes to Gatineau Park. Entering Gatineau Park from the pathway entrance just across from Tim Horton's on St. Raymond, we headed towards the Pioneers trail and the Gatineau Park Welcome Centre, located at P3. From here, heading East we continued on Sentier du Parc de la Gatineau, which runs near the road and has some short hills and plenty of turns and curves through the trees.
      A quick right turn at an intersection and we are brought down another path that travels underneath Boulevard des Allumetieres to cross to the other side. From here, the trail eventually rejoins and follows along closely to Allumetieres until you exit on St. Raymond. A little detour through a residential area and we are back on the path, this time the Pioneers Pathway. Featuring a few hills and a wooden bridge over a creek, this trail passes through a relatively dense forest area, where the sun interacting with the tree leaves produced beautiful light rays to pass through.
      Finally, the trail reaches one more intersection that leads us to the pedestrian overpass over Allumetieres, and towards home in the Plateau... and more bike trails through nature.
      I can't stress it enough, Gatineau Park is a jewel, and a paradise in nature. Whether it is to hike, walk, kayak, cycle or anything else, the scenery is beautiful and stunning and the park is immaculate. You never leave for home disappointed so come on out, discover your paradise and enjoy!
      Here are some pictures of our experiences out on the cycling trails. This trip was a loop that we did and was about 10km in distance, but at several points, there are plenty of options to stretch it even further and head off into new directions.
      Sentier du Parc de la Gatineau



      Pioneers Trail


      Heading up to the pedestrian overpass to cross over Allumetieres.

      The view from this angle on the bridge looks like something you'd see in Montreal or Laval... are we still in Gatineau?


      Heading onto the Sentier des Fées in the Plateau.


    • By Shane
      A perfect day out on the lake. Lac La Peche, located about 20 minutes West of Wakefield, is the largest lake in Gatineau Park. It is also possibly the most peaceful and relaxing to kayak. The beach is expansive, with plenty of room, making it easy to launch your kayak, canoe or small boat.
      Today, the wind was fairly strong, which had the effect of creating strong enough waves to push you around in the water. Luckily shortly after lunch the winds died down and it was much more enjoyable.
      This visit we decided to head to the left after setting off from the beach. We reached a small shore, perfect to get out at and stretch.
      There are several points across the lake that look nice to visit, from the twin rocks that are popular for people to fish or jump in the water, to the sandy shorelines across to the other side.
      Just like Lac Philippe, you are able to rent kayaks and canoes at the lake, so if you want to experience it but don't have your own, the opportunity is there.
      Overall, the perfect setting to stay cool in the summer. The beach is quite large, the lake is definitely inviting and the blue and green panoramic landscape is relaxing to take in.
      The only downside of this lake, whether coming to enjoy the beach or the water, is the gravel road that lasts about 8km, and takes 15-20 minutes to drive to reach the parking and the beach. While I understand that not every road can be paved, when they charge $12 vehicle access fee to reach the lake, it's not excusable. The dust flying as cars drive the road and though the parking is a bit much, and you are sure to have the rear of your car covered in dust by the time you arrive. Hopefully one day the NCC does the right thing and use the access money collected to pave the road.
      Here are some pictures from our time out on the lake.



      The twin rocks.


      Heading to the shore to stretch.





      Enjoy!
    • By Gordo
      About an hour north of Ottawa is a virtually unknown hiking trail near the town on Denholm. Parc des Chutes de Denholm is located on the Paugan road which connects Denholm with Low, Quebec. I drove in from the Denholm side as I was staying at a cottage near by.  From the Low side you would have to cross the Paugan dam. The hike consists of a 4km loop plus several smaller side trails.  The hike starts at a small falls and climbs quickly and steeply before leveling out.  One interesting aspect to the trail is commissioned public art that pops up along the walk. The hike is well marked with a single picnic table near the falls at the bottom and at the first lookout. There is also two rustic outhouses near the small parking lot.  If you want to get away from it all this hike is for you. We didn't see a single person for the 2 hours it took us to take in all the trails.  The main loop travels mainly through dense hardwoods crossing a creek at the half way point then connecting briefly with a gravel road before going back into the forest. The bottom trail on the south side of the Paugan road travels along a fern covered trail that follows the path of beautiful little creek.  I may have to come back in the winter an try the loop on snowshoes.



       

      A craved stone at the first lookout.




      A view of a marsh from the second lookout.












       
    • By Shane
      The Pink Lake trail is definitely an emerald jewel in the Gatineau Park. From its sparkling green water to the many lookout and observation points, this trail has it all.
      Easily accessible from the Gatineau Parkway, you are able to park at either the Pink Lake lookout or the Pink Lake trail parking lots. From here, the fun starts, and as the trail is a loop that circles the entire lake along its border, you have the choice to go clockwise or counter-clockwise. We chose the former for this visit. Exploring in this direction takes you to the best lookout points right from the start. 
      Pink Lake is very unique. Due to its sheltered location, provided by the surrounding trees and hills, the water is protected from most of the wind. This has the result of greatly limiting the movement of the water, and in fact, the water below 15m depth is void of any oxygen, a phenomenon that started over 10,000 years ago. The water receives its characteristic green hue due to the high algae content. 
      The following interpretation boards, posted along the trail help explain this unique geological location.



      Needless to say, it's quite the sight to see and experience. As the lake is a sensitive area, visitors are asked to stay on the trails (which are very easy to follow), to help the regeneration process essential to the continued survival of the lake.
      Walking the trail, you will come across plenty of lookout points, lots of stairs and sloping terrain, and plenty of benches to sit down and admire nature. The trail is more intermediate due to the climbs and stairs, but not as challenging as the King Mountain trail. 
      Overall, the Pink Lake trail is without a doubt among the top three trails of the park. The water, the scenery, the surrounding forests all combine to create a standout experience through nature.
      Here are some photos from our visit to Pink Lake.















      Happy trails.
×